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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. >> in egypt the u.s. embassy in cairo is closed. no one is being allowed in or out of the embassy now. embassy officials say the entrance is blocked by protesters as clashes erupt nearby. massive demonstrations against president morsy threatened the new young government after a degree last week extending his powers to an e uneasy level for some egyptians. americans in cairo going to the embassy for business, please don't. no one is going in or out of the embassy in cairo. >> and finding a way to steer clear of the fiscal cliff. the chief fiscal cliff negotiator tim geithner working with leaders to get things moving. there are just 33 days left to get a deal done. congress breaks for the holidays in just 15 days. dan lothian joins us. so the clock is ticking away. >> after the meeting the president had after he went to southeast asia the lawmakers were optimistic. now you are hearing some pessimistic as the clock winds down. you see the president pushing the bush era tax cut extension for middle class america. the white house doesn't believe this is the com
cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are going on strike. it could shut down the judicial system across the country this week. >> shannon: steve,
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
's call of duty, heading up to capitol hill to broker a debt deal. dagen: u.s. embassy closed in cairo amid protests, of bid muhamed morsi's power grab. connell: can you hear me now syndrome, wireless carriers are ranked on their performance. we will have the worst and the best. dagen: stocks now lend every 15 minutes, nicole petallides at stock exchange with economic news this morning. is that what is giving the market a lift? nicole: we have a lot going on here. we have jobless claims for the second week, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasu
hours before in cairo. what we think, then, transpired in benghazi is the extremist elements came to the consulate, as this was unfolding. >> notice the phrase "extremist elements." we since learned that ambassador rice was speaking to talking points, regarding jihadist groups, including a local al-qaeda affiliate. the intelligence community was said to have made the edit. michael morrell told senators the fbi was responsible. then later, cia officials contacted the senators and said the acting director misspoke, and it was actually the cia that changed the talking points. as we said last night, it is a bit of a mess and a real headache for president obama who defended susan rice today but did not mention libya. >> all right, guys, thank you. we want to get back to work. >> mr. president, can you care to -- >> thank you so much, guys. >> can you tell us about that? >> susan rice is extraordinary. couldn't be prouder of the job that she has done. >> here to talk about it, the former cia officer, he is a senior fellow at the defense of democracies, also joining us, national security
for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged
the new pharoah. we'll go live to cairo. heather: and expectant parents given the worst news possible about their baby, but what happens next can best be described as a thanksgiving prayer come true. stay tuned for this. >> they told me that he was alive, so it was wonderful, you know? everybody's happy, everybody's crying now because it was life. ♪ i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
, thousands of protesters spilling into the streets of cairo again this morning demanding president mohammed morsi be thrown out of office. they are angry over morsey's decision to give himself sweeping powers. a massive power grab on thursday into friday. peter doocy joins us live from d.c. with the latest. peter, this was frightening at how quick it happened and how it came immediately after susan rice praised what mr. morsey did there. >> right, dave. and mohammed morsi is actually egypt's first democratically elected president. but many of his people are protesting because he issued this decree that puts all his decisions in the past, present and future above judicial review. he can do whatever he wants and the lower courts can't. ' assembly writing egypt's new constitution can do so without any objections now, the u.s. state department issued a statement making their reservations about president morsey crystal clear and basically stating that the entire idea of the arab spring was the opposite of what's happening in egypt. the state department says, quote: one of the aspirations of the
this is the epicenter of the violence that is taking place, all eyes are in cairo, egypt. the head of egypt's intelligence has met with lead others palestinian factions. they say they're committed to a ceasefire under two conditions. one is that israel promises or at least pledges or guarantees that it will not resume targeted assassination and the deliberate killing of palestinian leaders and a lifting of the blockade and siege that has been imposed on gaza since 2006, which has restricted the free movement of people and goods and has really created a humanitarian crisis here. so they want to see that siege lifted. the egyptian, we understand, are expected to or may have actually communicated that to the israelis. and so it is now dependent on whether or not they can get the two sides to a cessation of hostilities, and when that time frame would unfold. so there is still no clear official timeline or clear answer, and no clear commitment from either side. but those interest demands as we understand them as they are being negotiated from the palestinian side. >> all right. live in gaza, tha
is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty for killing protesters in masters revolution, they would be retried. president mohammed morsi on the heel
it is the cairo speech that you delivered in 2009 or your repeated and important declarations on prevention of iran's nuclear capabilities, actions matter most. don't mistake the former for the latter. and today i just have to step out of my role for a moment because as a historian today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement for the people of the middle east. just imagine a president saying that. praise be to you and the name of god the passionate, the merciful. may god be upon you. this is a great day for you because behold a week, the american warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa and prisoner agreed jihad of american freedom once again but we don't remember that because words matter so much less than actions. if those are three broad lessons were the three most urgent issues on your agenda here won't repeat the words of my colleag
on the mississippi river are going to be so shallow between st. louis, missouri, and cairo, illinois, and then on top of that because of rock tentacles between red tower and theebs, illinois, that river traffic may come to a halt on the mississippi river. and that means there's going to be millions of tons of commodities that are not going to be able to be transported north and south on that river. and of course that affects not only the recipients of those commodities, and the shippers of those commodities, but in directly -- indirectly people who mine, make, manufacture, supply those commodities. and so this potentially can have a dramatic impact and negative way on the economy of our country at a time when we are trying to stimulate the economy, create more jobs, and make sure that we do not throw ourselves back into a recession. now, in november, early november, and even toward the end of october, over 15 united states senators, around 65 members of the house of representatives, five or six governors of various states have written letters to president barack obama, major philip may, regional admi
on americans. he goes on to say, this seems to be different than cairo attacks. yet the ambassador to the u.n. going out that morning and told everybody it was the tape. what does all this mean to you? >> it means that obviously cbs is not carrying out their responsibilities of informing the american people, but this is not the first action of this nature by a major network, but it is what it is. it's in their dna. what i've been finding out is i've been traveling around the country nonstop for the last two months, has been that americans are fed up. our veterans are angry in a way that i have never seen them angry. i'm seeing active duty people who come over and tell me, i've lost trust. i've lost trust in this commander in chief. i'm telling you, i don't know how much it affects the election and i don't know -- i know there is 1.6 million veterans in florida. they are angry. they have lost their trust in this commander in chief. and they want a full and complete investigation. the only way you're going to get a full and complete investigation is a watergate-type select committee that's bi
.s. ambassador has now extended to several dozen people. many of them with ties into egypt and cairo. what more do you know about that, sir? >> we do know that there are dozens of suspects. this threes right in the -- flies in the face of the administration told us that this was some mob and a video that got out of control. what is clear from the beginning it was terrorist attack that was coordinated. there were terrorist at it being activities in benghazi in months leading up to this. thanks to senator lindsey graham we're able to interview somebody there in tunisia. bill: you were just in tripoli. you did not come back with a favorable review. you have alleged that the administration is stonewalling. is that still the case now or has there been a little give-and-take on some information and questions you have? >> hopefully now we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did not. i sent the first letter over to secretary clinton on september 20th. they had the gal to print out pages on internet site and pretend they were somehow complying
the sinai peninsula, over here and also from cairo as well. now, there is big concern about the current egyptian government taking the side of hamas. >> yes. bill: publicly they a pier have tappear to have done that. we were told last year, be careful what they say in public compared to what they say in private. what concerns you with the current administration of egypt now. >> three things, one the border you just pointed to between gaza and egypt, that's been sealed. will the egyptians open that? and if they do then they allow military equipment, supplies to go frome from go from from egypt. the second thing i worry about is the demilitarized zone. that sinai peninsula is egyptian territory but there has been nobody there. it's a big desert. we've seen in the past year in a al-qaida has shet up shop and gone through and attacked israeli out po*es on the sinai-israeli border. the second thing i watch is what is going to happen with sinai, is it going to be a militarized zone instead of a demilitarized zone. bill: let's bring in the issue of libya and how that has changed over the past
understand there will be big demonstrations in cairo today. what are the risks right mow of egypt being drawn in fourth this conflict? >> the chances are actually fairly small. egypt has enough problems with it is with fighting militants next to gaza. egypt says it still respects the camp david peace accord signed with israel back in the late 1970s. obviously, we can expect egyptian politicians and leaders to make as much political hay as possible over this gaza violence, but it's highly unlikely that egypt has really the wherewithal or desire to get sucked into that conflict. i know from speaking to many egyptians, they don't have an appetite for it. they may sympathize with the people of gaza, but that sympathy does not extend to an eagerness or willingness to engage or become involved militarily in that conflict. >> all right, ben. in jerusalem this morning. thanks. >>> coming up later, soledad will be speaking to israel's deputy foreign minister. that's in our 7:00 hour. >>> here at home, president obama will have the four top leaders of congress over to the white house today to begin tal
in cairo as we speak. we have been deeply involved in helping to stand them up, and we are going to carefully consider what more we can do. i will be having much more to say about that as we move toward the friends of the syrian people meeting in morocco in the second week of december. no other decisions have been made yet, but we consider them on an almost daily basis. at the united states has provided more than $200 million in humanitarian assistance -- syrian people who weapon displaced are facing difficult conditions given the winter that is upon them. this remains a very difficult situation to manage because there are so many interests by all of the players, many of which are contradictory. turkey, for example, is very much at the leadership level, committed to seeing the end of the syrian regime, but incredibly worried that not enough will be done that empowers the kurds, particularly the pkk affiliates. jordan is working hard to maintain stability inside its own country. they are obviously worried about upsetting the delicate demographic balance inside. lebanon has tried v
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)